Moving? Here’s a Checklist of What to Do Before You Move

When the big moving day arrives, you will want to be as organized and pre-prepared as possible. Many tasks are best managed when your new home is vacant. Here is a moving checklist to help you navigate your move.

1. Since it is likely that the seller will turn off the utilities upon closing, contact the utility companies and have the utilities turned on in your name ahead of closing. Be sure to include setting up your Internet and cable services at the same time.

2. Make sure the vacant house has been cleaned to your standards. If not, hire a cleaning service if you don’t want to do it yourself. At an average cost of $150, you may want to leave it to a professional.

3. For closing day, arrange for a locksmith to come and change the locks. Often, the locksmith will only have to rekey the existing locksets at a reduced expense.

4. Any planned remodeling or renovations are best accomplished when the house is vacant. It is much easier than you having to live around construction debris.

5. If repairs need to be done, line up a handyman to get the work done right after you close.

6. Be aware of what safety items need to be in place prior to taking occupancy. Have a fire extinguisher for each level of the home. Ensure that the smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are in working order.

7. Prior to closing, have a walk-through with the seller or your home inspector so you can be familiar with the electrical service and water shutoff valves in an emergency. Get instructions on any other working systems of the home.

8. Have your mail forwarded and change your address profiles where needed.

Contact us for an even more extensive checklist to help with your move.

Should You Go with Fake Plants or Real Plants for Your Home?

Plants can help personalize a home and enhance the interior. Plants can also help sell a home. According to a survey by Costa Farms and Alloy Research, one third of plant owners feel that plants “make a house feel like a home and that they make any home seem more welcoming.” The question is: Fake plants or real plants? Here are some pointers to help you decide.

If you’re a frequent traveler, leaving live plants alone to fend for themselves may not be a good idea. Unless you have someone to check your home and to water and feed your plants in your absence, having live plants is probably not a good idea.

Consider your pets. Curious cats and dogs can destroy your natural indoor garden by nibbling on leaves or digging in the soil.

Whether your plants are real or fake, you’ll need to decide what level of maintenance you want to deal with. If you enjoy nurturing your plants with trimming, feeding and watering, then live plants will likely work for you. On the other hand, faux plants are dust collectors and require regular tedious cleaning.

If you have your home on the market and are having it staged, then fake plants may be the way to go. With the availability of a huge variety of faux plants, great marketing backdrops can be created. Staging is usually short-term, so these d├ęcor items seem to make the most sense. There are also companies that rent real plants for staging and will provide the required care.

When it comes to real or fake plants, call or email us, and we can help guide you in the right direction and provide you with supplier recommendations.